THE BEGINNING OF SORROWS

Anyone else see what’s going on?

THE MARK OF THE BEAST IS HERE

DUMB ON PURPOSE

2 Peter 3:3-55, “Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts,

And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation.

For this they willingly are ignorant of, that by the word of God the heavens were of old, and the earth standing out of the water and in the water:”

THE BEGINNING OF SORROWS
Yes, it can happen in the U.S.

U.S. Congressional Bill: H.R. 6666

Matthew 24:8-14, “All these are the beginning of sorrows.

Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake.

And then shall many be offended, and shall betray one another, and shall hate one another.

And many false prophets shall rise, and deceive many.

And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.

But he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.

And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.”

LOVE OF MANY SHALL WAX COLD

Matthew 24:12-14, “And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.

But he that shall endure unto the end, the same shall be saved.

And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.”

MARK OF THE BEAST
Microsoft Patent 060606

Link : Microsoft Patent WO2020060606

Revelation 13:16-18, “And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:

And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.”

Copyright ©1989 - 2020 AIRRINGTON MINISTRIES | www.airrington.com |All Rights Reserved.

Is the Septuagint Accurate?


The Septuagint – Psalm 1

The Greek translation of the Old Testament known as the Septuagint is not the inspired, infallible, inerrant, preserved word of God. It has errors and is inaccurate. It should not be used as a source.

Hebrew Cannot Be Preserved in Greek

We do have God’s preserved word today. The Bible tells us that God would preserve his word. If you cannot trust that what can you trust?  God’s word is inerrant and preserved. If it is not, then there is no reason or hope to study it.

Psalms 12:6-7 says, ” The words of the Lord are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times.

Thou shalt keep them, O Lord, thou shalt preserve them from this generation for ever.”

Psalms 119:89 says, “For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. ”

Isaiah 40:8 tells us, “The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the word of our God shall stand for ever.”

Matthew 5:18 says, ” For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled.”

If we do not have the preserved word of God today, then Jesus was wrong.

Matthew 24:35, ” Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away.”

If Jesus was wrong about what he said, then the word cannot be trusted.

1 Peter 1:23 says, “Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever.”

Deuteronomy 8:3 we are told “…that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live.

How can we live by every word if we do not have the preserved word of God? The Hebrew of the Old Testament cannot be preserved in another language. Psalm 119, for example, has twenty-two sections of eight verses that begin with a word that starts with a letter of the Hebrew alphabet. The first begins with Aleph, the next Beth, the third uses Gimel, then Daleth, and so on. No other language shows this relationship and the information is not seen in a translation.  Another issue to note is that the meaning of words used in prophecy can have multiple meanings. The meaning will not necessarily be known until the prophecy is fulfilled. When the words are translated into another language, the translators may use words that do not contain all the Hebrew meanings and may add some not in the original words. God’s word in Hebrew cannot be perfectly translated into Greek.

Ethiopia Is Not Cush

Genesis 2:10-14 describes four rivers at the Garden of Eden; the Hiddekel which is the Tigris, the Euphrates, the Pison and the Gihon. The Gihon went around the land of Cush.  

Cush 7 Ethiopia?  The two are not the same.

The Septuagint in Genesis 2:13 says, “And the name of the second river is Geon, this it is which encircles the whole land of Ethiopia.”

The Septuagint with Apocrypha - TGS International
The Septuagint with Apocrypha

The Greek says Aethiopia. The land cannot be Ethiopia. If it were Ethiopia then that would mean when Moses wrote this down, the river would have to flow around Ethiopia, cross the Great Rift Valley, cross over the Blue Nile, flow northward along the Nile without joining it, cross the Sinai Peninsula, cross the Arabian Peninsula and meet up with the Euphrates in Iraq at the north end of the Persian Gulf. It would have to go uphill and downhill. It would have to cross other bodies of water. It would have to flow farther than the Nile which is more than 4,000 miles long. Such a theory is not well thought out. It is just plain and simply wrong. So is the Septuagint when is uses Aethiopia instead of Cush.

Methuselah Did Not Survive the Flood

Genesis 5:26-31 records,

“And Methuselah lived after he begat Lamech seven hundred eighty and two years, and begat sons and daughters:

And all the days of Methuselah were nine hundred sixty and nine years: and he died.

And Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

 And he called his name Noah, saying, This same shall comfort us concerning our work and toil of our hands, because of the ground which the Lord hath cursed.

And Lamech lived after he begat Noah five hundred ninety and five years, and begat sons and daughters:

And all the days of Lamech were seven hundred seventy and seven years: and he died.”

According to the Bible Methuselah lived 782 years after Lamech was born and 600 years after Noah was born. Genesis 7:6 lets us know Noah was six hundred years old when the flood came. Methuselah was not on the ark. He died within a year of the flood.

What does the Septuagint say?  “And Mathusala lived a hundred and sixty and seven years, and begot Lamech. And Mathusala lived after his begetting Lamech eight hundred and two years, and begot sons and daughters. And all the days of Mathusala which he lived, were nine hundred and sixty and nine years, and he died. And Lamech lived a hundred and eighty and eight years and begot a son. And he called his name Noe, saying, this one will cause us to cease from our works, and from the toils of our hands, and from the earth, which the Lord God has cursed. And Lamech lived after his begetting Noe, five hundred and sixty and five years, and begot sons and daughters. And all the days of Lamech were seven hundred and fifty-three years, and he died.”

The Septuagint has Methuselah living 802 years after Lamech was born and Lamech having a son Noah at 188. That means that that Methuselah lived 614 years after Noah was born. The flood came in the 600th year of Noah’s life. Eight people survived. Methuselah if he was alive, was not one of them. He died shortly before or during the flood. The numbers in the Septuagint have Methuselah living 14 years after the flood.

The Septuagint has a different length of years in Genesis chapter five for the time between the father and son for Adam to Seth, Seth to Enos, Enos to Cainan, Cainan to Mahalalel, Mahalalel to Jared, Enoch to Methuselah, Methuselah to Lamech and Lamech to Noah. The time each one of these patriarchs lived after their son was born is also different between the Septuagint and the Bible. The Septuagint is wrong about Methuselah’s length of life after Lamech. It disagrees with itself. Therefore, we know it is wrong about the rest of the years. The Hebrew is correct.  The Greek is wrong.

Judith Has Nebuchadnezzar as King of Nineveh

If the Septuagint were correct the Book of Judith would not have been translated with it.

Judith 1:7 refers to “Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians, who reigned in Ninive the great city,” Nabuchodonosor is thought to be another name for Nebuchadnezzar the son of Nabopolassar who was king of Babylon and destroyed Nineveh.

Judith 4:1-2 says, “Now the children of Israel, that dwelt in Judea, heard all that Holofernes the chief captain of Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians had done to the nations, and after what manner he had spoiled all their temples, and brought them to naught.

Therefore, they were exceedingly afraid of him, and were troubled for Jerusalem, and for the temple of the Lord their God:” This refers to the time when Nebuchadnezzar ruled Babylon shortly before the first temple was destroyed. This lets us know the Nabuchodonosor of Judith is the Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. Judith is wrong because Nebuchadnezzar was not king of Assyria. Judith is wrong because he did not rule from the Nineveh which had been destroyed but instead Babylon.

Bel and the Dragon Claims Daniel Was in the Lion’s Den Seven Days

Bel and the Dragon is found in the extended book of Daniel in chapter 14. Verses 30-42 of this book claims, “So they came to the king, and said, deliver us Daniel, or else we will destroy thee and thine house. Now when the king saw that they pressed him sore, being constrained, he delivered Daniel unto them: Who cast him into the lions’ den: where he was six days. And in the den, there were seven lions, and they had given them every day two carcasses, and two sheep: which then were not given to them, to the intent they might devour Daniel. Now there was in Jewry a prophet, called Habbacuc, who had made pottage, and had broken bread in a bowl, and was going into the field, for to bring it to the reapers. But the angel of the Lord said unto Habbacuc, Go, carry the dinner that thou hast into Babylon unto Daniel, who is in the lions’ den.

And Habbacuc said, Lord, I never saw Babylon; neither do I know where the den is. Then the angel of the Lord took him by the crown, and bare him by the hair of his head, and through the vehemency of his spirit set him in Babylon over the den. And Habbacuc cried, saying, O Daniel, Daniel, take the dinner which God hath sent thee. And Daniel said, thou hast remembered me, O God: neither hast thou forsaken them that seek thee and love thee. So, Daniel arose, and did eat and the angel of the Lord set Habbacuc in his own place again immediately.

Upon the seventh day the king went to bewail Daniel: and when he came to the den, he looked in, and behold, Daniel was sitting. Then cried the king with a loud voice, saying, Great art Lord God of Daniel, and there is none other beside thee. And he drew him out and cast those that were the cause of his destruction into the den: and they were devoured in a moment before his face.”

What does the Bible say in Daniel 6:16-23?

“Then the king commanded, and they brought Daniel, and cast him into the den of lions. Now the king spake and said unto Daniel, Thy God whom thou servest continually, he will deliver thee.

And a stone was brought, and laid upon the mouth of the den; and the king sealed it with his own signet, and with the signet of his lords; that the purpose might not be changed concerning Daniel.

Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting: neither were instruments of musick brought before him: and his sleep went from him.

Then the king arose very early in the morning, and went in haste unto the den of lions.

And when he came to the den, he cried with a lamentable voice unto Daniel: and the king spake and said to Daniel, O Daniel, servant of the living God, is thy God, whom thou servest continually, able to deliver thee from the lions?

Then said Daniel unto the king, O king, live for ever.

My God hath sent his angel, and hath shut the lions’ mouths, that they have not hurt me: forasmuch as before him innocency was found in me; and also before thee, O king, have I done no hurt.

Then was the king exceedingly glad for him, and commanded that they should take Daniel up out of the den. So Daniel was taken up out of the den, and no manner of hurt was found upon him, because he believed in his God.”

” Daniel was in only one night. Bel and The Dragon incorrectly has him being released on the seventh day. The Bible says the den was sealed. Bel and Dragon wrongfully has Habbacuc feeding Daniel. The Septuagint is wrong and should have never included this.

Alms Do not Wash Away Sin

Tobit 12:9 says, “For alms doth deliver from death, and shall purge away all sin. Those that exercise alms and righteousness shall be filled with life:” See the English Translation of the Greek Septuagint Bible.

On the other hand Ephesians 2:8 makes it clear, “For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:”

Romans 4:3 explains that “Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness.”

Abraham was justified by faith and not by works. Works did not save people before Jesus died on the cross for our sins and they do not save you now.

Once You Know the Septuagint is Not the Word of God You Will Understand the Differences are Errors in the Septuagint

# Reference What the Septuagint Says What the Bible Says
1 Genesis 2:13 Ethiopia Cush
2 Genesis 2:15 delight Eden
3 Genesis 3:8 afternoon cool of the day
4 Genesis 4:26 he hoped to call on the name of the Lord God then men began to call upon the name of Lord
5 Genesis 5:3 Adam was 230 years old when Seth was born The Bible says 130 years.
6 Genesis 5:4 700 years 800 years
7 Genesis 5:6 205 years 105 years
8 Genesis 5:7 707 years 807 years
9 Genesis 5:9 190 years 90 years
10 Genesis 5:10 715 years 815 years
11 Genesis 5:12 170 years 70 years
12 Genesis 5:13 740 years 840 years
13 Genesis 5:15 165 years 65 years
14 Genesis 5:16 730 years 830 years
15 Genesis 5:21 165 years 65 years
16 Genesis 5:22 200 years 300 years
17 Genesis 5:25 167 years 187 years
18 Genesis 5:26 802 years 782 years
19 Genesis 5:28 188 years 182 years
20 Genesis 5:30 565 years 595 years
21 Genesis 5:31 753 years 777 years
22 Genesis 6:7-8 cattle beasts
23 Genesis 6:14-15 square wood gopher wood
24 Genesis 7:11 the flood came in the twenty seventh day of the second month of Noah’s life the flood came in the seventeenth day of the second month of Noah’s life
25 Genesis 8:3 twenty seventh day seventeenth day
26 Genesis 10:2 adds a son named Elisa to of Japeth’s children
27 Genesis 10:10 Babylon Babel
28 Genesis 10:22 adds a son named Cainan to Shem’s children
29 Genesis 10:24 adds a son between Arphaxad and Selah named Cainan
30 Genesis 10:32 Gentiles nations
31 Genesis 11:12 135 years 35 years
32 Genesis 11:12 Arphaxad had a son named Cainan Arphaxad had a son named Selah
33 Genesis 11:13 400 years 403 years
34 Genesis 11:13 Adds 130 years to the chronology with Cainan having a son named Seth instead of Arphaxad being the father of Selah
35 Genesis 11:14 130 years 30 years
36 Genesis 11:15 330 years 403 years
37 Genesis 11:16 134 years 34 years
38 Genesis 11:17 270 years 430 years
39 Genesis 11:18 130 years 30 years
40 Genesis 11:20 232 years 32 years
41 Genesis 11:22 130 years 30 years
42 Genesis 11:24 179 years 29 years
43 Genesis 11:25 125 years 119 years
44 Genesis 12:20 Lot was with Abraham in Egypt The Bible does not say that
45 Genesis 13:12 Lot pitched his tent in Sodom Lot pitched his tent toward Sodom
46 Genesis 14:5 Omits the Zuzim in Ham Includes Zuzim in Ham
47 Genesis 14:6 Adds a reference to the turpentine tree
48 Genesis 14:7 They cut in pieces all the princes of Amalec They smote all the country of the Amalekites
49 Genesis 14:11 cavalry goods
50 Genesis 14:14 nephew brother
51 Genesis 14:16 cavalry goods
52 Genesis 14:16 nephew brother
53 Genesis 15:2 Adds that Eliezer was the son of Masek Abraham’s home-born female slave
54 Genesis 15:11 Abraham sat down by them (sacrifices or the birds) Abraham drove away the birds
55 Genesis 15:21 Adds the Evites
56 Genesis 17:14 Adds on the eighth day
57 Genesis 17:20 Ishmael would have 12 nations Ishmael would have 12 princes
58 Genesis 20:14 Adds a thousand pieces of silver
59 Genesis 21:22 Adds Ochozath his friend
60 Genesis 21:32 Adds Ochozath his friend
61 Genesis 22:2 high land the land of Moriah
62 Genesis 22:13 a plant of Sabec a thicket
63 Genesis 22:21 Syrians Aram
64 Genesis 23:15 didrachms shekels
65 Genesis 23:16 didrachms shekels
66 Genesis 23:17 double cave Machpelah [Machpelah means double or portion but is cannot be shown whether this applies to the field, the cave or something else.]
67 Genesis 23:19 double cave cave of the field of Machpelah
68 Genesis 24:21 drachm half a shekel weight
69 Genesis 24:55 And her brethren and her mother said, Let the virgin remain with us about ten days, and after that she shall depart. And her brother and her mother said, Let the damsel abide with us a few days, at the least ten; after that she shall go. Brethren is plural. Brother is singular. About ten days is different than at least ten days.
70 Genesis 25:9 double cave cave of Machpelah
71 Genesis 26:14 many tilled lands great store of servants
72 Genesis 27:43 Adds into Mesopotamia
73 Genesis 28:2 Mesopotamia Padanaram
74 Genesis 28:5 Mesopotamia Padanaram
75 Genesis 28:19 Ulam-luz Luz
76 Genesis 29:1 went to the land of the east to Laban, the son of Bathuel the Syrian, and the brother of Rebecca, mother of Jacob and Esau came into the land of the people of the east
77 Genesis 30:14 barley-harvest wheat harvest
78 Genesis 30:14 apples of mandrakes mandrakes
79 Genesis 30:35 grey brown
80 Genesis 30:37 storax tree and walnut and plane-tree green poplar, and of the hazel and chesnut tree
81 Genesis 30:39 Adds ash-colored
82 Genesis 30:40 speckled and variegated ringstraked and brown
83 Genesis 31:8 white ringstraked
84 Genesis 31:10 speckled and variegated and spotted with ash-coloured spots ringstraked, speckled, and grisled
85 Genesis 31:12 speckled and variegated and spotted with ash-coloured spots ringstraked, speckled, and grisled
86 Genesis 31:18 Mesopotamia Padanaram
87 Genesis 31:41 thou didst falsely rate my wages for ten lambs thou hast changed my wages ten times
88 Genesis 31:42 yesterday yesternight
89 Genesis 33:18 Mesopotamia of Syria Padanaram
90 Genesis 33:19 lambs pieces of money
91 Genesis 35:4 turpentine tree oak tree
92 Genesis 35:9 Mesopotamia of Syria Padanaram
93 Genesis 35:21 Omits this phrase and brings the first part of verse 22 into verse 21 And Israel journeyed, and spread his tent beyond the tower of Edar
94 Genesis 35:26 Mesopotamia of Syria Padanaram
95 Genesis 36:21 Rison Dishon
96 Genesis 36:23 Golam Alvan
97 Genesis 36:24 Ana who found Jamin in the wilderness Anah that found the mules in the wilderness
98 Genesis 36:28 Rison Dishan
99 Genesis 36:30 Rison Dishan
100 Genesis 36:35 Getthaim Avith
101 Genesis 36:39 Arad the son of Barad Hadar
102 Genesis 36:39 Phogor Pau
103 Genesis 36:40 Gola Alvah
104 Genesis 36:43 Zaphoin Iram
105 Genesis 37:28 gold money (silver)
106 Genesis 38:14 gates of Aenan open place
107 Genesis 38:21 Aenan by the way-side openly by the way side
108 Genesis 39:1 officer of Pharaoh eunuch of Pharaoh
109 Genesis 40:2 eunuchs officers
110 Genesis 43:11 gum and honey, and frankincense, and stacte, and turpentine, and walnuts a little balm, and a little honey, spices, and myrrh, nuts, and almonds
111 Genesis 45:10 Gesem of Arabia Goshen
112 Genesis 45:22 gold money (silver)
113 Genesis 45:23 mules female donkeys
114 Genesis 45:23 bread corn and bread
115 Genesis 46:13 Asum Job
116 Genesis 46:15 Mesopotamia of Syria Padanaram
117 Genesis 46:16 Angis Haggi
118 Genesis 46:16 Aedis Eri
119 Genesis 46:17 Jeul Isui
120 Genesis 46:20 adds “And there were sons born to Manasses, which the Syrian concubine bore to him, even Machir And Machir begot Galaad And the sons of Ephraim, the brother of Manasses; Sutalaam, and Taam And the sons of Sutalaam; Edom”
121 Genesis 46:21 deletes “Gera, and Naaman, Ehi, and Rosh, Muppim, and Huppim, and Ard as sons of Benjamin and gives Gera, and Noeman, and Anchis, and Ros, and Mamphim to his sons Belah” and adds “And Gera begot Arad”
122 Genesis 46:22 eighteen fourteen
123 Genesis 46:27 nine two
124 Genesis 46:27 seventy-five seventy
125 Genesis 46:34 Gesem of Arabia Goshen
126 Genesis 47:12 corn bread
127 Genesis 47:13 corn bread
128 Genesis 48:7 Mesopotamia of Syria Padanaram
129 Genesis 48:8 as I drew night to the horse-course of Chabratha of the land [of Chanaan], so as to come to Ephratha when yet there was but a little way to come unto Ephrath: and I buried her there in the way of Ephrath
130 Genesis 48:22 And I give to thee Sicima, a select portion above thy brethren Moreover I have given to thee one portion above thy brethren
131 Genesis 49:6 in their passion they houghed a bull in their selfwill they digged down a wall
132 Genesis 49:14 Issachar has desired that which is good; resting between the inheritances Issachar is a strong [donkey] couching down between two burdens
133 Genesis 49:15 husbandman a servant unto tribute
134 Genesis 49:21 Nephthalim is a spreading stem, bestowing beauty on its fruit Naphtali is a hind let loose: he giveth goodly words
135 Genesis 49:22 Joseph is a son increased; my dearly loved son is increased; my youngest son, turn to me Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well; whose branches run over the wall
136 Genesis 49:24 he that strengthened Israel from the God of thy father thence is the shepherd, the stone of Israel
137 Genesis 49:27 gives food divide the spoil
138 Genesis 49:30 double cave cave that is in the field of Machpelah
139 Genesis 50:13 double cave cave of the field of Machpelah
140 Exodus 1:5 seventy-five seventy
141 Exodus 6:20 132 137
142 Exodus 13:18 and in the fifth generation the children of Israel went up out of the land of Egypt and the children of Israel went up harnessed out of the land of Egypt
143 Exodus 14:21 south wind east wind
144 Exodus 14:25 axle-trees of their chariots were bound the LORD took off the Egyptians’ chariot wheels
145 Exodus 15:27 stems of palm trees palm trees
146 Exodus 22:18 sorcerers witch
147 Exodus 30:13 didrachm shekel
148 Exodus 30:13 oboli gerah

The Septuagint Changes Names From the Hebrew

1 Genesis 2:10 Edem Eden
2 Genesis 4:16 Edem Eden
3 Genesis 4:18 Gaidad Irad
4 Genesis 4:22 Thobel Tubalcain
5 Genesis 10:4 Rhodians Dodanim
6 Genesis 10:8 Nebrod Nimrod
7 Genesis 10:12 Dase Resen
8 Genesis 14:5 Ommaeans in the city Save Emims in Shaveh Kiriathaim
9 Genesis 23:2 Arboc Kirjatharba
10 Genesis 41:45 Psonthomphanech Zaphnathpaaneah

The Septuagint Is Not God’s Word

God said he would preserve his word which cannot be done in Greek. The Septuagint has outright errors in it. It has many other differences in it from the Masoretic text. Once we know the Septuagint is not God’s Word, we will understand the differences are a result of errors in the Greek which are many.  By itself there is no way of knowing when it is correct or when it is wrong. It cannot be used as God’s Word.

I trust only the King James Bible.  Proven…over 400 years.  No other work can make that claim.  The 1611 Edition was translated by 54 men of God using 5,309 Greek Manuscripts which virtually all agreed. Today we have over 5,800 Manuscripts, including the Dead Sea Scrolls…all line up word for word with the King James Bible.

God’s Word is PERFECT, INNERRANT, INSPIRED, INFALLIBLE and PRESERVED!  If it is not the King James, then I need to get to work and find it.  Because God says that such a Bible exists today…for me.  Every word, every verse, ever chapter, every book, ever promise is mine!


Copyright ©1989 - 2020 AIRRINGTON MINISTRIES | www.airrington.com |All Rights Reserved.

Noah’s ark & the flood

Noah’s Ark & The Flood

Genesis 6-7

The story of Noah is amazing!  It includes a family;  Mr. & Mrs. Noah, their three sons; Shem, Ham, Japheth, and their beautiful wives. Plus, all the animals of the earth; all the land animals – horses, pigs, giraffes, rhinoceros, hippopotamuses, Kangaroos, dogs, cats, bears, llamas, platypus dinosaurs.  Some animals Noah took two of each of their kind.  Noah had to remember to get a pink and a blue one because that would be important later.  Other animals he took 7 of each kind of the clean animals.  This was for food and for sacrifice to God.  Noah also built a huge boat made of gopher wood called an Ark.  This ark was HUGE, it was 300 cubits long (450 feet), 50 cubits wide (75 feet) and 30 cubits high (45 feet).  A cubit is about 18 inches.   Bigger than a US Nuclear Submarine, bigger than a football field, four times bigger than a 747-jet and much bigger than a house.  My house anyway!  We also have in this store a flood.  I great big flood.  This flood was so big it covered all the dry land on the earth, all the hills and all the mountains.  Everything outside of Noah’s big, hugamungus Ark, drowned and died.   We find animals all over the earth, including fish and dinosaurs buried in the dirt, all mixed up and drowned.  and why we have rainbows.

It all starts with Noah.  Did you know that after Noah was 500 years old he had 3 sons?  I don’t know about you, but I’ve only met one or two people that were 100 years old and they were old!  After Noah was 500 years old things started getting very interesting for him.  One day as God was thinking about the people on earth His heart became very sad.  He could see that all the people had become very bad, so bad that they stopped thinking of anything good.

Figure 3: Dinosaur and Animal Graveyards mixed, found all over the world. From a world-wide flood.

God was so sad and hurt that he wanted to get rid of every person and all the creatures that He had made.  He wanted all the evil to stop.  The thing about God is that He gets very angry at our sin and all the bad stuff in the world, but we also know that God is love.  God IS love, so that means that He can be disappointed when we do bad things, but He still loves us, and that’s why He remembered Noah.

Noah was the only one that was righteous (which means that he did things right).  He was a good guy and he walked with God.

So, God said to Noah, “I am going to put an end to all the people because the earth is full of fighting because of them.  I am going to destroy them and the earth.”

God then gave Noah instructions on how to make the boat.  He told him what kind of wood and how big to make it.  He also told him to put a door in the side of the ark and to make it with three floors.  The ark was humongous!  We’ll get to that more later in the story.

The Bible says that next God told Noah that He would make a covenant with him.  A covenant is an agreement with a promise.  He would save Noah, his wife, and his three sons and their wives.  They would be safe in the ark because God was going to flood the whole earth and everything else would die. 

I’m missing one other BIG thing that’s going in the ark with Noah and his family… and that is…  The animals!  Two of all living creature’s male and female (or the boy and girl of each).  Plus, two of every kind of bird and every creature that moves along the ground.

Then food for each of them for as long as they were on the boat.  Yikes!  That’s a lot of animals and a lot of food.  I think it would’ve been a very full, noisy, stinky place to be, but they would all be safe.

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It’s hard to describe how big the ark actually was but if you think of some of the biggest animals you know (elephant, moose, buffalo, giraffe, rhino, gorilla) and make sure you have 2 of each of those plus all the other little animals that couldn’t be stepped on…they needed a lot of room!

Some people think it took over 100 years to build the ark and the Bible says that Noah was 600 years old when the flood waters came.

Keep in mind that Noah was building a big ark because God told him to.  I have a feeling Noah and his family were teased a lot from the other people.  What if your neighbor started building a huge boat on your street?  It would sound a little strange…

When the ark was done God gave Noah 7 days warning before the flood to get all the animals and food on board and told him that He would send rain for 40 days and 40 nights.

When everyone was in the ark God shut the door.

Then the rain started.  The Bible makes it sound like the rain came from the clouds and that there was also water coming up from the ground.  So everything probably was covered pretty quickly.

The floods kept coming for 40 whole days!  The ark floated on the water and all the high mountains were completely covered with water.

Every living thing died on the earth that wasn’t in the ark. 

So, the rain came for 40 days and nights but when it stopped Noah and the animals couldn’t just leave the ark.  There was too much water and no land for them to walk on, everything was covered.

The waters flooded the earth for one hundred and fifty days, which is about five months.

God remembered Noah and all that was in the ark, so he sent a wind to help dry the earth.  Finally, in the seventh month after the floods had stopped the ark rested on the top of a mountain.

A little while after that (40 days) Noah opened a window he had made for the ark and probably let in some fresh air!  Ha!  Even more importantly he let a raven out.  It would fly back and forth to the ark until the water had dried.

Then he sent out a dove, but the dove couldn’t find any place to go.  He is waiting a week and then sent the dove out again.  This time the dove came back with an olive leaf which meant the waters had gone down.  He waited one more week and let the dove out again and this time it didn’t return.

From the way the Bible describes Noah, his family and the animals were in the boat for just over a year or 370 days!  That’s a long time to be on a boat with all those animals!

Stunning Rainbow Photos That Will Brighten Your Day | Reader's Digest

When the earth had dried up enough God told Noah that everyone could get out of the boat.  That probably was a very happy day!  Maybe a little uncertain as well.  There would be no one but them on earth and they would have to start all over building a house, collecting food…there wasn’t a big grocery store waiting for them when they got off the ark.

Then Noah built an altar to thank God for keeping them safe.  When God saw what Noah had done, he told Noah that he would never again curse the ground even if people became very bad.

Then he made his official covenant with Noah and with all the animals.  God would never bring a flood to kill all living creatures and destroy the whole earth again.

Then he gave them a sign for everyone to see this promise.  He put a rainbow in the sky and that’s to remind us of the promise God made to Noah, the animals and us today!

So, whenever you see a rainbow say a little prayer and thank God that he loves us and that He keeps His promises.

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Portraits of the Apostles

Peter (Son of Jonah)

Greek from Aramaic: Rock

Original name in Greek (Simon): Hearing

Simon Peter, the son of Jonah of Bethsaida (Matthew 16:17), lived in Capernaum (John 1:42) as a skilled fisherman of Galilee. While Peter may have spoken colloquial Greek, his native tongue would have been Aramaic. According to Mark 1:30, Peter had a wife whose mother was healed by the Lord from a terrible fever. Both he and his brother, Andrew, were fishing partners with the sons of Zebedee (Mark 1:16), James and John.

As seen in Matthew 4:18-19, Christ had called these men into a new service – to be “fishers of men.” From this righteous command, Peter and the others learned to pick up their cross and follow Christ, the Son of the living God. Beforehand, Peter had been discipled by John the Baptist, the forerunner of Christ (John 1:35-42). Peter was instrumental in the proclamation of the Good News after the resurrection of Christ. After a full life of spreading the beloved gospel, tradition holds that Peter was martyred in Rome between AD 60-69. He was crucified upside down, considering himself unworthy to die the same death of his Lord. He has been considered the first traditional bishop of Rome and his tomb is believed to be under the high altar in the Basilica of St. Peter of Rome.

Unlike many of the disciples, we can identify well with Peter. His shortcomings of little and faltering faith in Christ are all too common in our own lives (Matthew 14:28-30). However, throughout scripture, he is known as the Rock (Matthew 16:18). From Pentecost onwards, he would become a “Pillar Apostle” (Galatians 2:9) and a foundational stone for the other apostles.

Before Christ entered his life, he had been considered arrogant boasting and a man of rash action. But then, from the moment of his calling by Jesus to his denial of Christ, he became a man of impulse and childlike simplicity mixed with much insecurity. These character flaws began to change after two influential interactions with Christ. Both the appearance of Jesus after the resurrection (Luke 24:34) and Christ’s commission to “feed my sheep” (John 21:15) brought a new light to the life of Peter. He was often singled out by Jesus (Mark 8:29-33) and was present for many miracles and amazing experiences (e.g. the raising of Jarius’s daughter to life (Mark 5:25-41), the transfiguration (Mark 9:2-8), and the arrest of Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane (Mark 14:43-50).

Peter took the leadership role of the early church and became known for his numerous miracles in the name of Jesus Christ. Throughout history, Peter has been particularly remembered for his threefold denial, his repentance, and the threefold commission of Christ. Although Peter was a diamond in the rough, God faithfully used him to show the beautiful grace found in Christ and the simplicity of faith in the Omnipotent God.

Andrew

Greek: Manly

As the brother of Simon Peter, Andrew was also a disciple of John the Baptist and was the first follower of Jesus to be identified by name. His interaction with Christ caused him to immediately leave and tell Peter of the Messiah, the Son of God (John 1:35-42). Eventually, he and Peter left their fishing business to follow their beloved Saviour. Within the glorious ministry of Christ, Peter and Andrew witnessed amazing marvels and miracles. Among them, Christ used five loaves of bread from a boy, brought forth by Andrew, to feed the five thousand people who had gathered to hear the word of God (John 6:8).

We find the last appearance of Andrew before the Passover festival in Jerusalem, and after the triumphal entry on the first Palm Sunday. Men from Greece approached Philip and Andrew hoping to see the Christ: “Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” Both Philip and Andrew returned to Jesus and told Him of these men (John 12:21).

Later in his ministry, Andrew preached the gospel to the Scythians, Sogdians, and the Sacae in Sebastopolis, Ethiopia, in AD 80. Because he would not submit to the Roman idols, he was crucified by Aegeas, the governor of the Edesenes, and buried in Patrae, in Archaia.

James and John (Sons of Zebedee)

Greek: Sons of Thunder

While mending their fishing nets, the sons of Zebedee, James and John, were called by Jesus to be “fishers of men.” The two brothers and Peter formed the innermost circle of Jesus’ closest companions. They became the eyewitnesses of the life, work, and resurrection of Christ Jesus. They were present to attest to the resurrection of Jarius’s daughter, to the transfiguration of the Lord, and to the events in the garden of Gethsemane. They became known as the “Sons of Thunder” for their high spirits and zeal as seen in their desire to destroy an unfriendly Samaritan city (Luke 9:51-56). However, they were also dedicated to the purpose of their Lord and played a significant part in the church.

Fifteen years after hearing the call of the Lord upon the shores of Galilee, James was killed under the rule of King Agrippa I. “Now about that time Herod the king stretched forth his hands to vex certain of the church. And he killed James the brother of John with the sword” (Acts 12:1-2). The martyrdom of James is the only biblical and reliable account of a death of one of the twelve apostles.

John was referred to as “one of the disciples, whom Jesus loved,” in the gospel of John and is said to be the author of the fourth gospel. John is the only disciple to be recorded as being present at the crucifixion of Christ. After the death of Jesus, he took the Lord’s mother, Mary, as his own. He was also the first to see the glorious sight of the empty tomb. John was one of the early leaders of the church and thus became known as a “Pillar of the Church” (Galatians 2:9). According to tradition, John was banished to the Island of Patmos (Revelation 1:9) after he survived being thrown into boiling oil under Domitian. On that desolate Island, John received visions of the future and words from the Lord to seven churches. The compilation of these visions and letters formed the Book of Revelation. John Foxe also adds that he was released from Patmos and allowed to return to Ephesus in the year of A.D. 97.

Philip

Philip is mentioned in all three Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) as the man from Bethsaida who was a disciple of John the Baptist. Both Philip and Andrew appear together in the listings of the apostles found in the gospels and in the Book of Acts. In the Book of John, he is portrayed as one who had a deep understanding of the Old Testament prophecy and of the coming Messiah; as well, he demonstrated a heart for missions (John 1:43-46; 12:21-22). However, he struggled with spiritual insight evidenced in his converse with Christ at the feeding of the five thousand (John 6:5-7; 14:7-9).

There is some dispute over the events of Philip’s later life and ministry. A second century Ephesian tradition believes he died at Hierapolis, roughly one hundred miles inland of Ephesus. Another tradition says Philip was crucified; and as a result, medieval art often depicts Philip on the cross.

Bartholomew

Greek from the Aramaic: Son of Tomai

Bartholomew is found in all four lists (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and Acts) of the apostles and was present during the selection of Matthias. Many scholars associate Bartholomew with the surname “Nathanael.” If the identification of Bartholomew with Nathanael is correct, Philip brought Bartholomew (Nathanael), a native of Cana of Galilee (John 21:2), to acknowledge Jesus as the Messiah. Yet, Jesus was already familiar with Bartholomew as seen in John 1:48-51:

Nathanael said to Him, “How do You know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you.” Nathanael answered Him, “Rabbi, You are the Son of God; You are the King of Israel. Jesus answered and said to him, “Because I said to you that I saw you under the fig tree, do you believe ? You will see greater things than these.” And He said to him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, you will see the heavens opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.

In the Gospel of John, he is mentioned with the seven apostles during the Lord’s last post-resurrection appearance (John 21:2). However, little information is revealed about his life and ministry with Christ. According to Foxe’s Book of Marytrs, he has been said to have preached throughout India and translated the Gospel of Matthew into their tongue. Later in his ministry, Bartholomew was beaten, crucified, and beheaded in Albinopolis, Armenia for the sake of his Master.

Thomas

Hebrew: A twin

Known as “Doubting Thomas,” he was the pessimistic, loyal, and practical disciple whose suspicions of the resurrection vanished as he touched the wounds of his risen Master. He was present in the upper room during Pentecost (when the Holy Spirit descended upon the believers). However, very little of the New Testament mentions him again. It seems that there are three significant occurrences involving Thomas and Christ.

The first occasion begins when Jesus was hounded out of Jerusalem and was seeking a quiet and secluded town for safety. When word came of Lazarus’s illness, Jesus waited two days before leaving for Bethany that the Father would be glorified. Although Thomas was frightened, he was loyal to his Master and accompanied Him during the dangerous travels. We come to understand the threatening situation and the loyalty of Thomas in John 11:16: “Let us also go, that we may die with Him.”

A second reference to Thomas’s interaction with Christ can be found in the upper room, during the Last Supper, before the arrest of Jesus. Jesus sat among his disciples and told them of His coming departure: “In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.” And Thomas responded with, “Lord, we known not whither Thou goest; and how can we know the way?” From this simple question came the beautiful answer that many Christians cherish today. “Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.” Indeed, He is the way and the life. By His grace, Christ is our daily strength and satisfaction. By His redeeming blood, we have access to the Almighty God.

Third, we rejoin the disciples in the upper room after the crucifixion of Christ as they hid from the Jews. Then Christ appeared to them in all His glorious magnificence; yet Thomas was not among the disciples (John 20:19-24). Being the practical man that he was, Thomas did not believe the other disciples when they had told him of their risen Lord. One week later, the followers of Christ hid once more from the Jews in the upper room. It was then when Christ appeared a second time and Thomas realized his Saviour had indeed raised from the dead. “Thus saith He to Thomas, reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.” As Thomas came to grips with the glorious understanding of his risen King, he cried, “My Lord and My God!”

According to tradition, Thomas traveled to Persia and South India, where he founded the ancient Mar Thoma Church, in Travancore and Cochin, now called Kerala. He has been recognized for writing an apocryphal book that may have been written in the second century. It has also been said that Thomas was martyred near Madras at Mount St. Thomas.

Matthew

Greek: Gift of God

Originally named Levi, Matthew, was a Jew from Capernaum (Mark 2:14). In Matthew 9:9, responding to Christ, he immediately “arose and followed Him” and began a new life serving the Lord. Many biblical scholars see this as a representative of how Christians should react when Jesus Christ exhorts them to seek the path of righteousness (Matthew 16:24).

The call of Matthew is told in all three of the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) as Jesus makes an unexpected choice to call forth a tax collector to be His disciple. As a tax collector, or publican, Matthew transferred taxes from both local merchants and farmers to the Roman state. In that day, tax collectors were seen as thieves because they often took taxes for personal gain.

Immediately after he rose to follow the Lord, Matthew gave Jesus a large banquet in which he invited many tax collectors and sinners (Luke 5:29). The Pharisees criticized Jesus for dining with such an appalling group of wretched sinners; yet Jesus rebuked them saying,” I have not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance” (Luke 5:32). Indeed, He came to save sinners from all condemnation and eternal destruction. What a wonderful comfort to cherish! May we immediately rise up and seek Christ with all our hearts and souls. Thus, we will spend eternity in His everlasting and glorious presence!

Within his gospel, Matthew reveals the Messiah to be the fulfillment of the Old Testament law: for the Son of God is the true sacrificial lamb (Hebrews 10:10). Based upon the work of Mark, Matthew portrays the life of Christ in a more complete manner through long dissertations, as seen in the Sermon on the Mount. Throughout his book, Matthew emphasizes the teaching of Christ as a source of guidance for the church. In his later ministries, Matthew preached to Ethiopia and all of Egypt and was later killed with a spear under the leadership of King Hircanus.

James (Son of Alphaeus)

While his name appears in the four New Testament listings of apostles, little is known about James. He is usually identified with “James the Younger,” the son of Mary (not the mother of Jesus), and the brother of Joses (Mark 15:40; Matthew 27:56). This distinction of “younger” or “less” (Gk ho mikros) differentiates him from James the brother of Jesus and James the son of Zebedee. The terms “younger” or “less” refer to his younger age, smaller physique, and less significance. His mother, Mary, was among the crowd at the crucifixion of Jesus and the discovery of the empty tomb (Matthew 27:56; Mark 15:40; 16:1; Luke 24:10).

Simon the Zealot

Before his calling to follow Christ, Simon was a zealous nationalist who wanted to drive out the Romans from the cities; his group tactics often resulted in bloody conflict. Both the Gospel of Luke and Book of Acts link Simon with Judas (not Iscariot) throughout their writings. Little is known about the lives of both Simon and Judas (not Iscariot). According to the apocryphal book, The Passion of Simon and Jude, we are told their lives ended in martyrdom in Persia.

Thaddaeus

Greek: “Large Hearted” and “Courageous”

Unlike the other apostles, Thaddaeus claims three separate names: Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3), Judas, son of James (Mark 3:18), and Labbaeus (not found in the Revised Standard Version). However, little is know about the life and ministry of Thaddaeus. The New Testament records only one event involving Thaddeus: his question to Jesus during a message to the disciples after the Last Supper:

Judas (not Iscariot) said to Him, “Lord, what then has happened that You are going to disclose Yourself to us and not to the world?” Jesus answered and said to him, “If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our abode with him (John 14:22).

Judas Iscariot

Some believe the name “Iscariot” identifies Judas’s place of origin, since his father is described as “Simon Iscariot” (John 6:71; 13:2, 26). After his calling to seek the Lord, Judas Iscariot became the treasurer for the twelve disciples (John 12:4-6; 13:29). Because this position is not given to one of greedy and irresponsible conduct, it may be assumed that he showed positive characteristics before the other followers of Christ. However, the Gospel of John tells us that during his time as treasurer, Judas had become a thief, stealing from the treasury funds (John 12:6).

Judas has become infamous for his betrayal of Jesus. Both Luke and John render him to be under the influence of Satan himself (Luke 22:3; John 13:2). It may have been his greed that motivated him to betray Jesus for a worthless amount of thirty pieces of silver (Matthew 26:14-16; Mark 14:10-11; Luke 22:3-6).

In the Garden of Gethsemane, Judas led a band of soldiers to Jesus and identified Him with a kiss (Matthew 26:47-56; Mark 14:43-52; Luke 22:47-53; John 18:2-12). Yet when Jesus was condemned to death, Judas was filled with great remorse and returned the pieces of silver to the priests. Then Judas departed from the temple and committed suicide by hanging himself (Matthew 27:3-10; Acts 1:18-19). After the resurrection of Christ, Matthias replaced Judas within the circle of the twelve apostles (Acts 1:26).

Matthias

Greek: Gift of Jehovah

Before 120 followers of Christ, Peter gave an account of the life, ministry, and the death of Judas Iscariot. Because of the loss of Judas, a replacement was in order to fill the gap within the original twelve apostles. It was necessary to select one who had known them since the Lord’s baptism by John to the resurrection of the Son of Man. These twelve witnesses would represent the twelve tribes of Israel. Thus, these followers of Christ gathered together to cast lots between two candidates: Joseph called Barsabas (Justus) and Matthias. “And they drew lots for them, and the lots fell to Matthias; and he was numbered with the eleven apostles” (Acts 1:26). Many believe that Barsabbas and Matthias were among the seventy disciples who were sent out to proclaim the gospel (Luke 10:1). However, neither one is mentioned again in Scripture, nor is there any account for their later ministries.

Paul of Tarsus

Greek from Latin: Little

Paul, the author of thirteen New Testament Epistles, was born as an Israelite in Tarsus of Cilicia (Acts 22:3; Philippians 3:5). His original name was Saul. He studied under Gamaliel in Jerusalem (Acts 22:3) and became a Pharisee (Philippians 3:5). He was present at the stoning of Stephen (Acts 7:58; 8:1) and later became a persecutor of the church (Acts 8:1-3; Philippians 3:6). While he was seeking to have Christians bound, he was converted on the road to Damascus as Christ appeared to him (Acts 9:1-9). He went into Damascus (Acts 9:10-19) and then to Arabia for a period of time (Galatians 1:17) before returning to Jerusalem (Acts 9:26-29; Galatians 1:18). Eventually, he met with Barnabas and ministered with him in Antioch (Acts 11:25-26). Soon he began to go on various missionary journeys to bring the Gospel to the Gentiles. He was then imprisoned in Rome on two occasions and was martyred under Caesar Nero.

Please visit the timeline of Paul the Apostle for a detailed chronology of Paul’s life.

Barnabas

Greek from the Hebrew: Son of Exhortation

Originally from Cyprus (Acts 4:36), Barnabas settled Jerusalem. Both he and Paul of Tarsus (whose close friend he would become) shared similar Jewish roots (Acts 4:36) and Hellenistic backgrounds of the Jewish Diaspora. The first appearance of Barnabas in the New Testament can be found among the earliest converts, selling his lot of land and giving the profit to the apostles (Acts 4:36). He quickly became well liked and a respected leader within the apostolic circle.

Paul and Barnabas began a close partnership within the work of ministry. Their common background in the Diaspora and their traditional training as a Pharisee and Levite may have brought about the strong companionship.

Because of the heavy persecution of the Hellenized Christians, many believers were scattered as far as Phoenicia and Syria. Thus the church of Antioch was established in Syria, which would become the future headquarters of Paul’s journeys. The leaders in Jerusalem soon elected Barnabas to be the superintendent of the church and he, in turn, chose Paul to be his assistant. Barnabas accompanied Paul on a missions trip that covered approximately 1,400 miles of territory as they proclaimed the gospel and encouraged the body of Christ. During the first tour, Paul and Barnabas traveled to Cyprus with John Mark. Acts 12:25 and 13:5 imply that John Mark was in Antioch and later teamed with Paul and Barnabas. However, when Paul and Barnabas decided to climb the mountains to Antioch of Pisidia, John Mark turned back. During this first tour, Paul became the spokesperson, and even engaged in vigorous discussions within the council. Barnabas was also given recognition and even a divine title in Acts 14:12. Unlike Paul, he never experienced violence or stoning while ministering to others.

Following their first journey, Paul and Barnabas went to Jerusalem to settle the controversial issue of the law and circumcision. After a stimulating debate, it was decided that gentiles could be given admittance to the church if they conform to certain social customs of the Jews.

After a successful trip, Barnabas suggested that John Mark join them on the next journey. Yet Paul felt otherwise and the team divided. Paul traveled with another entourage and Barnabas and John Mark journeyed to Cyprus.

In any case, the dispute did not end the friendship between Paul and Barnabas. In a letter to the Corinthians, Paul uses both he and Barnabas as an example of apostles who still maintain a working trade while serving in ministry and they refused to accept charity from churches. Indeed, Paul, Barnabas, and John Mark all make vital contributions to the Christian faith and the New Testament.

Sources:

Wilkins, Michael J. “Disciples” in Joel B. Green, et al. Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels. (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 1992), p. 180.

Brownrigg, Ronald. Who’s Who in the New Testament, (Nashville, Tennessee: Pillar Books for Abingdon Press, 1971)

Wilkins, Michael J. “Barnabas” in Joel B. Green, et al. Dictionary of Paul and His Letters. (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 1993), p. 66-67.

Foxe, John; Foxe’s Christian Martyrs of the World, (Uhrichsville, Ohio: Barbour and Company Inc, 1989)

Lockyer, Herbert. All the Apostles of the Bible, (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1972)

Copyright ©1989 - 2020 AIRRINGTON MINISTRIES | www.airrington.com |All Rights Reserved.

The Names of God in the Old Testament

  • Introduction
  • El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty)
  • El Elyon (The Most High God)
  • Adonai (Lord, Master)
  • Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah)
  • Jehovah Nissi (The Lord My Banner)
  • Jehovah-Raah (The Lord My Shepherd)
  • Jehovah Rapha (The Lord That Heals)
  • Jehovah Shammah (The Lord Is There)
  • Jehovah Tsidkenu (The Lord Our Righteousness)
  • Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The Lord Who Sanctifies You)
  • El Olam (The Everlasting God)
  • Elohim (God)
  • Qanna (Jealous)
  • Jehovah Jireh (The Lord Will Provide)
  • Jehovah Shalom (The Lord Is Peace)
  • Jehovah Sabaoth (The Lord of Hosts)

Introduction

“Let them praise the name of the LORD: for his name alone is excellent; his glory [is] above the earth and heaven.” Psa 148:13

In the Old Testament times, a name was not only identification, but an identity as well. Many times a special meaning was attached to the name. Names had, among other purposes, an explanatory purpose (e.g., Nabal, whose name means “fool,” is the target of Abigail’s explanation to David: “For as his name is, so is he; Nabal is his name, and folly is with him:” – 1Sa 25:25). Throughout Scripture God reveals Himself to us through His names. When we study these names that He reveals to us in the Bible, we will better understand who God really is. The meanings behind God’s names reveal the central personality and nature of the One who bears them.

Who is God to you?

Is He your Most High God, All sufficient One, Master, Lord of Peace, the Lord Who Will Provide? Is He your Father? We must be careful not to make God into an “it” or a “thing” to which we pray. He is our Jehovah Raah, the Lord our Shepherd. God knows us by our name, shouldn’t we know Him by His?

Hallowed be Your name?

To hallow a thing is to make it holy or to set it apart to be exalted as being worthy of absolute devotion. To hallow the name of God is to regard Him with complete devotion and loving admiration. God’s name is of the utmost importance (Neh 9:5); therefore we ought reserve it a position of grave significance in our minds and hearts. We should never take His name lightly (Exd 20:7; Lev 22:32), but always rejoice in it and think deeply upon its true meaning.

El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty)

(el shad-di’)
All-Sufficient One, Lord God Almighty

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament El Shaddai occurs 7 times. El Shaddai is first used in Gen 17:1.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 2333

Strong’s Reference: H7706

El Shaddai in the Septuagint: theou saddai – God Shaddai; pantokratôr (for Shaddai) – the Almighty

Meaning and Derivation: El is another name that is translated as “God” and can be used in conjunction with other words to designate various aspects of God’s character. Another word much like Shaddai, and from which many believe it derived, is shad meaning “breast” in Hebrew (some other scholars believe that the name is derived from an Akkadian word Šadu, meaning “mountain,” suggesting strength and power). This refers to God completely nourishing, satisfying, and supplying His people with all their needs as a mother would her child. Connected with the word for God, El, this denotes a God who freely gives nourishment and blessing, He is our sustainer.

Further references of the name El Shaddai in the Old Testament: Gen 17:1; Gen 28:3; Gen 35:11; Gen 43:14; Gen 48:3

El Elyon (The Most High God)

(el el-yone’)
The Most High God

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament El Elyon occurs 28 times. It occurs 19 times in Psalms. El Elyon is first used in Gen 14:18.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 1624g, 1624h

Strong’s Reference: H5945

El Elyon in the Septuagint: ho theos ho hupsistos – the God most high

Meaning and Derivation: El is another name that is translated as “God” and can be used in conjunction with other words to designate various aspects of God’s character. Elyon literally means “Most High” and is used both adjectivally and substantivally throughout the Old Testament. It expresses the extreme sovereignty and majesty of God and His highest preeminence. When the two words are combined – El Elyon – it can be translated as “the most exalted God.”(Psa 57:2)

Further references of the name El Elyon in the Old Testament: Gen 14:18; Gen 14:19; Gen 14:20; Gen 14:22; Psa 57:2; Psa 78:35

Adonai (Lord, Master)

(ad-o-noy’)
Lord, Master

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Adonai occurs 434 times. There are heavy uses of Adonai in Isaiah (e.g., Adonai Jehovah). It occurs 200 times in Ezekiel alone and appears 11 times in Daniel Chapter 9. Adonai is first used in Gen 15:2.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 27b

Strong’s Reference: h136

Adonai in the Septuagint: kurios – Lord, Master

Meaning and Derivation: Adonai is the verbal parallel to Yahweh and Jehovah. Adonai is plural; the singular is adon. In reference to God the plural Adonai is used. When the singular adon is used, it usually refers to a human lord. Adon is used 215 times to refer to men. Occasionally in Scripture and predominantly in the Psalms, the singular adon is used to refer to God as well (cf. Exd 34:23). To avoid contravening the commandment “Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain” (Exd 20:7), sometimes Adonai was used as a substitute for Yahweh (YHWH). Adonai can be translated literally as, “my lords’ ” (both plural and possessive).

Further references of the name Adonai in the Old Testament: Complete list available here.

Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah)

(yah-weh)
Lord, Jehovah

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Yahweh occurs 6,519 times. This name is used more than any other name of God. Yahweh is first used in Gen 2:4.

Variant spellings: YHWH, Jehovah

TWOT Reference: 484a

Strong’s Reference: H3068

Yahwehin the Septuagint: kurios – Lord, Master
despotês – Lord, Master, denoting the omnipotence of God (TDNT), despot, absolute ruler

Meaning and Derivation: Yahweh is the promised name of God. This name of God which (by Jewish tradition) is too holy to voice, is actually spelled “YHWH” without vowels. YHWH is referred to as the Tetragrammaton (which simply means “the four letters”). YHWH comes from the Hebrew letters: Yud, Hay, Vav, Hay. While YHWH is first used in Genesis 2, God did not reveal Himself as YHWH until Exodus 3. The modern spelling as “Yahweh” includes vowels to assist in pronunciation. Many pronounce YHWH as “Yahweh” or “Jehovah.” We no longer know for certain the exact pronunciation. During the third century A.D., the Jewish people stopped saying this name in fear of contravening the commandment “Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain” (Exd 20:7). As a result of this, Adonai is occasionally a substitute for YHWH. The following compound names which start with “YHWH” have been shown using “Jehovah.” This is due to the common usage of “Jehovah” in the English of these compound names in the early English translations of the Bible (e.g., the Geneva Bible, the King James Version, etc.).

Further references of the name Yahweh in the Old Testament: Complete list available here.

Jehovah Nissi (The Lord My Banner)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ nis-see’)
The Lord My Banner, The Lord My Miracle

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah-Nissi occurs only once in Exd 17:15.

Variant spellings: Jehovah Nisi; Jehovahnissi

TWOT Reference: None

Strong’s Reference: H3071

Jehovah Nissi in the Septuagint: kurios kataphugê mou – the Lord is my refuge

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Nes (nês), from which Nissi derived, means “banner” in Hebrew. In Exd 17:15, Moses, recognizing that the Lord was Israel’s banner under which they defeated the Amalekites, builds an altar named Jehovah-Nissi (the Lord our Banner). Nes is sometimes translated as a pole with an insignia attached. In battle opposing nations would fly their own flag on a pole at each of their respective front lines. This was to give their soldiers a feeling of hope and a focal point. This is what God is to us: a banner of encouragement to give us hope and a focal point.

Further references of the name Jehovah Nissi in the Old Testament: Exd 17:15

Jehovah-Raah (The Lord My Shepherd)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ raw-aw’)
The Lord My Shepherd

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah-Raah (The Lord my Shepherd) is used in Psalm 23.

Variant spellings: Jehovah Rohi; Jehovah Ro’eh

TWOT Reference: 2185, 2186

Strong’s Reference: H7462

Jehovah-Raah in the Septuagint: kurios poimainei me – the Lord shepherds me

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Rô’eh from which Raah derived, means “shepherd” in Hebrew. A shepherd is one who feeds or leads his flock to pasture (Eze 34:11-15). An extend translation of this word, rea’, is “friend” or “companion.” This indicates the intimacy God desires between Himself and His people. When the two words are combined – Jehovah Raah – it can be translated as “The Lord my Friend.”

Further references of the name Jehovah-Raah in the Old Testament: Gen 48:15; Gen 49:24; Psa 23:1; Psa 80:1

Jehovah Rapha (The Lord Who Heals)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ raw-faw’)
The Lord That Heals

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah-Rapha (The Lord that Heals) is used in Exd 15:26.

Variant spellings: Jehovah-Rophe; Jehovah Rophecha; Jehovah Raphah

TWOT Reference: 2196

Strong’s Reference: H7495

Jehovah Rapha in the Septuagint: kurios ho iômenos se – the Lord your healer

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Rapha (râpâ’) means “to restore”, “to heal” or “to make healthful” in Hebrew. When the two words are combined – Jehovah Rapha – it can be translated as “Jehovah Who Heals.” (cf. Jer 30:17; Jer 3:22; Isa 30:26; Isa 61:1; Psa 103:3). Jehovah is the Great Physician who heals the physical and emotional needs of His people.

Further references of the name Jehovah Rapha in the Old Testament: Exd 15:26

Jehovah Shammah (The Lord Is There)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ shawm’-maw)
The Lord Is There

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah Shammah occurs only once in Ezekiel 48:35.

Variant spellings: Jehovah Samma

TWOT Reference: None

Strong’s Reference: H3074

Jehovah Shammah in the Septuagint: estai to onoma autês – the name thereof

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Shammah is derived from the Hebrew word sham, which can be translated as “there.” Jehovah Shammah is a symbolic name for the earthly Jerusalem. The name indicates that God has not abandoned Jerusalem, leaving it in ruins, but that there will be a restoration.

Further references of the name Jehovah Shammah in the Old Testament: Eze 48:35

Jehovah Tsidkenu (The Lord Our Righteousness)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ tsid-kay’-noo)
The Lord Our Righteousness

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah Tsidkenu occurs 2 times. Jehovah Tsidkenu is first used in Jer 23:6.

Variant spellings: Jehovah Tzidkaynu; Jehovah Tsidqenuw

TWOT Reference: None

Strong’s Reference: H3072

Jehovah Tsidkenu in the Septuagint: kuriou tou theou hêmôn elalêsen pros hêmas – the Lord our God spoke to us

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Tsedek (tseh’-dek), from which Tsidkenu derived, means “to be stiff,” “to be straight,” or “righteous” in Hebrew. When the two words are combined – Jehovah Tsidkenu – it can be translated as “The Lord Who is our Righteousness.”

Further references of the name Jehovah Tsidkenu in the Old Testament: Jer 23:6; Jer 33:16

Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The Lord Who Sanctifies You)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ M-qadash)
The Lord Who Sanctifies You, The Lord Who Makes Holy

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah Mekoddishkem occurs 2 times. Jehovah Mekoddishkem is first used in Exd 31:13.

Variant spellings: Jehovah M’kaddesh

TWOT Reference: 1990

Strong’s Reference: H6942

Jehovah Mekoddishkem in the Septuagint: kurios ho hagiazôn humas – the Lord that sanctifies you

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Mekoddishkem derives from the Hebrew word qâdash meaning “sanctify,” “holy,” or “dedicate.” Sanctification is the separation of an object or person to the dedication of the Holy. When the two words are combined – Jehovah Mekoddishkem – it can be translated as “The Lord who sets you apart.”

Further references of the name Jehovah Mekoddishkem in the Old Testament: Exd 31:13; Lev 20:8

El Olam (The Everlasting God)

(el o-lawm’)
The Everlasting God, The God of Eternity, The God of the Universe, The God of Ancient Days

Use in the Bible: El Olam is first used in Gen 21:33.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 1631a

Strong’s Reference: H5769

El Olamin the Septuagint: [ho] theos [ho] aiônios – the everlasting God

Meaning and Derivation: El is another name that is translated as “God” and can be used in conjunction with other words to designate various aspects of God’s character. Olam derives from the root word ‘lm (which means “eternity”). Olam literally means “forever,” “eternity,” or “everlasting”. When the two words are combined – El Olam – it can be translated as “The Eternal God.”

Further references of the name El Olam in the Old Testament: Gen 21:33; Jer 10:10; Isa 26:4

Elohim (God)

(el-o-heem’)
God, Judge, Creator

Use in the Bible: : In the Old Testament Elohim occurs over 2000 times. Elohim is first used in Gen 1:1.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 93c

Strong’s Reference: H430

Elohim in the Septuagint: theos – the standard Greek word for god, “a transcendent being who exercises extraordinary control in human affairs or is responsible for bestowal of unusual benefits” (BDAG). It specifically refers to the monotheistic God of Israel.

Meaning and Derivation: Elohim is translated as “God.” The derivation of the name Elohim is debatable to most scholars. Some believe it derived from ‘êl which, in turn, originates from the root word, ‘wl (which means “strong”). Others think that Elohim is derived from another two roots: ‘lh (which means “god”) in conjunction with ‘elôah (which means “fear”). And still others presume that both ‘êl and Elohim come from ‘eloah.

Further references of the name Elohim in the Old Testament: Complete list available here.

Qanna (Jealous)

(kan-naw’)
Jealous, Zealous

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Qanna occurs 6 times. Qanna is first used in Exd 20:5.

Variant spellings: Kanna

TWOT Reference: 2038b

Strong’s Reference: H7067

Qanna in the Septuagint: zêlôtês – jealous

Meaning and Derivation: Qanna is translated as “jealous,” “zealous,” or “envy.” The fundamental meaning relates to a marriage relationship. God is depicted as Israel’s husband; He is a jealous God, wanting all our praise for Himself and no one else. (cf. Exd 34:14)

Further references of the name Qanna in the Old Testament: Exd 20:5; Exd 34:14; Deu 4:24; Deu 5:9; Deu 6:15

Jehovah Jireh (The Lord Will Provide)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ yir-eh’)
The Lord Will Provide

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah-Jireh occurs only once in Gen 22:14.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: None

Strong’s Reference: H3070

Jehovah Jireh in the Septuagint: kurios eiden – the Lord has seen

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Jehovah-Jireh is a symbolic name given to Mount Moriah by Abraham to memorialize the intercession of God in the sacrifice of Isaac by providing a substitute for the imminent sacrifice of his son.

Further references of the name Jehovah Jireh in the Old Testament: Gen 22:14

Jehovah Shalom (The Lord Is Peace)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ shaw-lome’)
The Lord Is Peace

Use in the Bible: In the Old Testament Jehovah-Shalom occurs only once in Jdg 6:24.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: None

Strong’s Reference: H3073

Jehovah-Shalom in the Septuagint: eirênê kuriou – peace of the Lord

Meaning and Derivation: Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Shalom is a derivative of shâlêm (which means “be complete” or “sound”) Shalom is translated as “peace” or “absence from strife.” Jehovah-Shalom is the name of an altar built by Gideon in Ophrah.

Further references of the name Jehovah-Shalom in the Old Testament: Jdg 6:24

Jehovah Sabaoth (The Lord of Hosts)

(yeh-ho-vaw’ se ba’ôt)
The Lord of Hosts, The Lord of Powers

Use in the Bible: Jehovah and Elohim occur with Sabaoth over 285 times. It is most frequently used in Jeremiah and Isaiah. Jehovah Sabaoth is first used in 1Sa 1:3.

Variant spellings: None

TWOT Reference: 1865a, 1865b

Strong’s Reference: H6635

Jehovah Sabaoth in the Septuagint: kurios sabaôth – the Lord of hosts (sabaôth: Gr. transliteration of Heb. “hosts”)

Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Sabaoth (se bâ’ôt) means “armies” or “hosts.” Jehovah Sabaoth can be translated as “The Lord of Armies” (1Sa 1:3). This name denotes His universal sovereignty over every army, both spiritual and earthly. The Lord of Hosts is the king of all heaven and earth. (Psa 24:9-10; Psa 84:3; Isa 6:5).

Further references of the name Jehovah Sabaoth in the Old Testament: 1Sa 1:11; 1Sa 17:45; 2Sa 6:18; 2Sa 7:27; 1Ki 19:14; 2Ki 3:14; 1Ch 11:9; Psa 24:10; Psa 48:8; Psa 80:4; Psa 80:19; Psa 84:3; Isa 1:24; Isa 3:15; Isa 5:16; Isa 6:5; Isa 9:19; Isa 10:26; Isa 14:22; Jer 9:15; Jer 48:1; Hsa 12:5; Amo 3:13; Mic 4:4; Nah 3:5; Hag 2:6; Zec 1:3; Mal 1:6; Hab 2:13; Zep 2:9

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A Summary of the Contents of Each Bible Book

Old Testament

Genesis

Describes the creation; gives the history of the old world, and of the steps taken by God toward the formation of theocracy.

Exodus

The history of Israel’s departure from Egypt; the giving of the law; the tabernacle.

Leviticus

The ceremonial law.

Numbers

The census of the people; the story of the wanderings in the wilderness.

Deuteronomy

The law rehearsed; the death of Moses.

Joshua

The story of the conquest and partition of Canaan.

Judges

The history of the nation from Joshua to Samson.

Ruth

The story of the ancestors of the royal family of Judah.

1 Samuel

The story of the nation during the judgeship of Samuel and the reign of Saul.

2 Samuel

Story of the reign of David.

1 and 2 Kings

The books of Kings form only one book in the Hebrew MSS. They contain the history of the nation from David’s death and Solomon’s accession to the destruction of the kingdom of Judah and the desolation of Jerusalem, with a supplemental notice of the liberation of Jehoiachin from his prison at Babylon, twenty-six years later; they comprehend the whole time of the Israelitish monarchy, exclusive of the reigns of Saul and David.

The Books of Chronicles

are so called as being the record made by the appointed historiographers of the kingdoms of Judah and Israel; they are the official histories of those kingdoms.

Ezra

The story of the return of the Jews from the Babylonish captivity, and of the rebuilding of the temple.

Nehemiah

A further account of the rebuilding of the temple and city, and of the obstacles encountered and overcome.

Esther

The story of a Jewess who becomes queen of Persia and saves the Jewish people from destruction.

Job

The story of the trials and patience of a holy man of Edom.

Psalms

A collection of sacred poems intended for use in the worship of Jehovah. Chiefly the productions of David.

Proverbs

The wise sayings of Solomon.

Ecclesiastes

A poem respecting the vanity of earthly things.

Solomon’s Song

An allegory relating to the church.

Isaiah

Prophecies respecting Christ and his kingdom.

Jeremiah

Prophecies announcing the captivity of Judah, its sufferings, and the final overthrow of its enemies.

Lamentations

The utterance of Jeremiah’s sorrow upon the capture of Jerusalem and the destruction of the temple.

Ezekiel

Messages of warning and comfort to the Jews in their captivity.

Daniel

A narrative of some of the occurrences of the captivity, and a series of prophecies concerning Christ.

Hosea

Prophecies relating to Christ and the latter days.

Joel

Prediction of woes upon Judah, and of the favor with which God will receive the penitent people.

Amos

Prediction that Israel and other neighboring nations will be punished by conquerors from the north, and of the fulfillment of the Messiah’s kingdom.

Obadiah

Prediction of the desolation of Edom.

Jonah

Prophecies relating to Nineveh.

Micah

Predictions relating to the invasions of Shalmaneser and Sennacherib, the Babylonish captivity, the establishment of a theocratic kingdom in Jerusalem, and the birth of the Messiah in Bethlehem.

Nahum

Prediction of the downfall of Assyria.

Habakkuk

A prediction of the doom of the Chaldeans.

Zephaniah

A prediction of the overthrow of Judah for its idolatry and wickedness.

Haggai

Prophecies concerning the rebuilding of the temple.

Zechariah

Prophecies relating to the rebuilding of the temple and the Messiah.

Malachi

Prophecies relating to the calling of the Gentiles and the coming of Christ.

New Testament

Gospel of St. Matthew

A brief history of the life of Christ.

Gospel of St. Mark

A brief history of the life of Christ, supplying some incidents omitted by St. Matthew.

Gospel of St. Luke

The history of the life of Christ, with especial reference to his most important acts and discourses.

Gospel of St. John

The life of Christ, giving important discourses not related by the other evangelists.

Acts of the Apostles

The history of the labors of the apostles and of the foundation of the Christian Church.

Epistle to the Romans

A treatise by St. Paul on the doctrine of justification by Christ.

First Epistle to the Corinthians

A letter from St. Paul to the Corinthians, correcting errors into which they had fallen.

Second Epistle to the Corinthians

St. Paul confirms his disciples in their faith, and vindicates his own character.

Epistle to the Galatians

St. Paul maintains that we are justified by faith, and not by rites.

Epistle to the Ephesians

A treatise by St. Paul on the power of divine grace.

Epistle to the Philippians

St. Paul sets forth the beauty of Christian kindness.

Epistle to the Colossians

St. Paul warns his disciples against errors, and exhorts to certain duties.

First Epistle to the Thessalonians

St. Paul exhorts his disciples to continue in the faith and in holy conversation.

Second Epistle to the Thessalonians

St. Paul corrects an error concerning the speedy coming of Christ the second time.

First and Second Epistles to Timothy

St. Paul instructs Timothy in the duty of a pastor, and encourages him in the work of the ministry.

Epistle to Titus

Epistle to Titus. St. Paul encourages Titus in the performance of his ministerial duties.

Epistle to Philemon

An appeal to a converted master to receive a converted escaped slave with kindness.

Epistle to Hebrews

St. Paul maintains that Christ is the substance of the ceremonial law.

Epistle of James

A treatise on the efficacy of faith united with good works.

First and Second Epistles of Peter

Exhortations to a Christian life, with various warnings and predictions.

First Epistle of St. John

Respecting the person of our Lord, and an exhortation to Christian love and conduct.

Second Epistle of St. John

St. John warns a converted lady against false teachers.

Third Epistle of St. John

A letter to Gaius, praising him for his hospitality.

Epistle of St. Jude

Warnings against deceivers.

The Revelation

The future of the Church foretold.

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The Books of the Bible

Order Book Title(s) Chapters Verses
I. Law
1. The First Book of
Moses
Called Genesis
50 1,533
2. The Second Book of Moses Called Exodus 40 1,213
3. The Third Book of Moses Called Leviticus 27 859
4. The Fourth Book of Moses Called Numbers 36 1,288
5. The Fifth Book of Moses Called Deuteronomy 34 959
II. Old Testament
Narrative
6. The Book of
Joshua
24 658
7. The Book of
Judges
21 618
8.
The Book of Ruth
4 85
9. The First Book of Samuel 31 810
10. The Second
Book of Samuel
24 695
11. The First Book
of Kings
22 816
12. The Second
Book of Kings
25 719
13. The First Book
of Chronicles
29 942
14. The Second
Book of
Chronicles
36 822
15. The Book of
Ezra
10 280
16. The Book of
Nehemiah
13 406
17. The Book of
Esther
10 167
III. Wisdom Literature
18. The Book of Job 42 1,070
19. The Book of Psalms 150 2,461
20. The Book of Proverbs 31 915
21. The Book of Ecclesiastes 12 222
22. The Song of Songs (or Song of Solomon or Canticles) 8 117
IV. Major Prophets
23. The Book of Isaiah 66 1,292
24. The Book of
Jeremiah
52 1,364
25. The Book of
Lamentations
5 154
26. The Book of Ezekiel 48 1,273
27. The Book of
Daniel
12 357
V. Minor Prophets
28. The Book of Hosea 14 197
29. The Book of Joel 3 73
30. The Book of Amos 9 146
31. The Book of
Obadiah
1 21
32. The Book of Jonah 4 48
33. The Book of Micah 7 105
34. The Book of Nahum 3 47
35. The Book of
Habakkuk
3 56
36. The Book of
Zephaniah
3 53
37. The Book of Haggai 2 38
38. The Book of
Zechariah
14 211
39. The Book of
Malachi
4 55
VI. New
Testament
Narrative
40. The Gospel According to Matthew 28 1,071
41. The Gospel According to Mark 16 678
42. The Gospel According to Luke 24 1,151
43. The Gospel According to John 21 879
44. The Acts of the Apostles 28 1,007
VII. Pauline Epistles
45. The Epistle of Paul to the
Romans
16 433
46. The First Epistle of Paul to
the Corinthians
16 437
47. The Second Epistle of Paul
to the Corinthians
13 257
48. The Epistle of Paul to the
Galatians
6 149
49. The Epistle of Paul to the
Ephesians
6 155
50. The Epistle of Paul to the
Philippians
4 104
51. The Epistle of Paul to
the Colossians
4 95
52. The First Epistle of Paul
to the Thessalonians
5 89
53. The Second Epistle of Paul to the Thessalonians 3 47
54. The First Epistle of Paul
to Timothy
6 113
55. The Second Epistle of
Paul to Timothy
4 83
56. The Epistle of Paul to
Titus
3 46
57. The Epistle of Paul to
Philemon
1 25
VIII. General Epistles
58. The Epistle to the
Hebrews
13 303
59. The General Epistle of James 5 108
60. The First Epistle of
Peter
5 105
61. The Second Epistle of
Peter
3 61
62. The First Epistle of
John
5 105
63. The Second Epistle
of John
1 13
64. The Third Epistle of
John
1 14
65. The Epistle of Jude 1 25
IX.
Apocalyptic
Epistle
66. The Book of Revelation (or The Apocalypse of John) 22 404

Total Number of Chapters and Verse

1,189
31,102

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You are being scammed!


Constantin von Tischendorf in 1870

Tischendorf (he “found” the Codex Sinaiticus in the “trash”) claimed the Codex Sinaiticus has more than 14,800 corrections or changes, making it the most corrected manuscript in existence.

About the same time the Codex Vaticanus was “discovered” is described as a 4th Century Text, however, under scrutiny it’s clear it was almost entire text has been overwritten by a 15th Century Scribe!

These two fake text would primarily become the Critical Text used by Westcott & Hort to create all these Modern Trashlations, such as; NIV, ESV, NASV, NWT, NLT, CEV, CSV, AMP, NKJV, WEB, and and nearly 300 more!

Still trust your Bible? 14,800 corrections and changes!!!

Come on Christians…think! You are being scammed!

ALL MODERN TRASHLATIONS (ESV, NLT, NIV, AMP, NASV, etc.) Use these manuscripts.

ALL OF THE MODERN TRASHLATIONS (NWT, ESV, NASV, NLT, NIV, CEV, AMP, etc.) use these faulty manuscripts. Check your bible right now. Is it missing Mark 16:9-20 (The Resurrection of Jesus Christ, The Great Commission [Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel…], The Ascension of Jesus Christ — DELETED!)? It may be marked with [brackets], italicized or footnoted (a) telling you that it does not belong there.

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Is the Fish a “Christian” symbol?


Better Google: ‘Egyptian fish god” and perhaps STOP using it.

Are crosses Christian symbols?

(1.) 97.9% of the time the people wearing a cross are NOT a Christian.

(2.) The cross was NEVER intended to be a religious symbol.

(3.) If you Dad or your son got the electric chair would you wear an electric chair around your neck to remember them?

Available from www.passthewordkjb.com

(4.) The cross is a symbol that predates Christ. The symbol is associated with Tammuz from the Babylonian Religion. (Babylonian Mystery Religion, p. 51) or Babylon Religion by David W. Daniels.

From Babylon, the cross spread to other nations and was associated with paganism long before Jesus’ crucifixion in A.D. 31

(5.) a. It was a shameful instrument of death (Hebrews 12:2).
b. While the apostles preached “the cross [stauros]” as part of the history of Christ’s ministry for our sakes (1 Corinthians 1:17-18), it was not something they idolized

(6.) What does the Bible teach about wearing any religious symbol?

Under the Old Covenant that God made with ancient Israel, God instructed them to wear reminders of their faith upon their hands (Deuteronomy 6:8; 11:18). In fulfillment of this command, phylacteries, small leather boxes containing scriptural passages, were traditionally worn by Jewish men during their morning weekday prayers. However, many did this to “appear” religious to those around them. (Matthew 23:5)

(7.) During His New Testament ministry, Jesus taught His followers to display their spirituality through their actions and deeds (Matthew 5:16). Under the New Covenant, ushered in by Christ, God’s laws are to be written on our hearts—that is, in our minds (Hebrews 8:10; 10:16).

Wearing a gold cross does not make you a Christian any more than sitting in a garage makes you are car.

If you would like to learn more about the history of the cross and how this pagan symbol entered Christianity, read chapters 6 and 7 of Ralph Woodrow’s book, Babylon Mystery Religion. These two chapters are respectively titled “Is the Cross a Christian Symbol?” and “Constantine and the Cross.”

Order Babylon Religion and I will include the digital copies of the Books:

1. Babylon Mystery Religion
2. A Woman Rides The Beast (Available from http://www.passthewordkjb.com .)

Absolutely free. Just mention you saw this on Facebook.

* I have no way of knowing if the persons depicted in the attached photos are saved or not. The point is wearing a cross does not make you saved. The bigger the cross does not make you more saved any more than wearing more than one cross. Christians need to be careful about the symbols the idolize and glorify.

The NKJV has a satanic symbol as it’s logo! That is an essay for another day.

St. Christopher Talisman. For Protection?


Beware of talisman and symbols. St. Christopher cannot protect you any more than my grandfather can…and they are both dead! Jesus is alive…you want a symbol? Look to Jesus the author and finisher of your faith!

Copyright ©1989 - 2020 AIRRINGTON MINISTRIES | www.airrington.com |All Rights Reserved.

Servant vs. slave

Why do new versions, & even well-meaning preachers, wrongfully refer to Christians as “slaves”?

In the KING JAMES BIBLE the word “doulos” is always translated “servant”. This is consistent with the dictionary definition of servant. WEBSTER’S DICTIONARY defines a servant as “one who exerts himself for the benefit of another. So, calling us servants of Christ is very accurate.

The word “slave”, as used by modern trashlations such as the; NIV, NKJV, NASV, ESV, CEV, RSV, etc. is defined by WEBSTER’S DICTIONARY as a person held in bondage, one who has lost control of himself, no freedom of action.

I have been saved for 30 years, I would certainly not describe my relationship with my Saviour, the Lord Jesus Christ, as someone who has “lost control, no freedom of action, a drudge. The NIV and NASV, in Ephesians 6:6 and several other places, call us “slaves of Christ”, instead of “servants of Christ”.

We know that we are “servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart” (Ephesians 6:6). We do it because we love Him and because we want to do it. Leviticus 25:39-46 differentiates between “hired servant” and bond slaves, indicating that God’s children are never to be seen as bond slaves!

In fact, Jesus said, “Hensforth I call you not servants…but I have called you friends (John 15:15).

The switch from the original “servants” to the corrupt “slaves” can be traced from its use by heretics to its sad adoption by mainstream Christians.

Acts 2

1.) GOTHIC BIBLE 1st – 7th Centuries, ‘SERVANTS’
2.) ANGLO-SAXON BIBLE 700 – 900 A.D., ‘SERVANT’
3.) WYCLIFFE, TYNDALE, GREAT BIBLE & BISHOPS BIBLES 900 – 1611, ‘SERVAUNT’
4.) KING JAMES BIBLE 1611, ‘SERVANT’
……………………………………………………………………………………..

5.) JAMES STRONG 1890, ‘SLAVES’
6.) NEW AMERICAN STANDARD VERSION* 1969, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1877, 1995, ‘BONDLAVES’
7.) NEW WORLD TRANSLATION (Jehovah’s Witness Bible) 1961, ‘SLAVES’
8.) NEW AMERICAN BIBLE (Roman Catholic) 1970, 1986, ‘SLAVES’
9.) NEW REVISED STANDARD VERSION, 1989, 1993 (ALL VERSIONS), ‘SLAVES’
10.) INTERNATIONAL STANDARD VERSION 1995, ‘SLAVES’
11.) NEW LIVING TRANSLATION 1996, ‘SLAVES’
12.) HOLMAN CHRISTIAN STANDARD BIBLE 2000, ‘SLAVES’
13.) ERNESTLY CONTEND FOR THE FAITH; BOOK OF JUDE 2002, ‘SLAVES’
14.) JUBILEE BIBLE 2000, 2001, 2010, ‘SLAVES’
15.) NEW CENTURY VERSION 2005, ‘SLAVES’
16.) THE EXPANDED BIBLE 2011, ‘SLAVES”
17.) NEW TESTAMENT FOR EVERYONE 2011, ‘SLAVES’
18.) LEXHAM ENGLISH BIBLE 2012, ‘SLAVES’
19.) TREE OF LIFE VERSION 2015, ‘SLAVES’

Question? Why is it that virtually all English Bibles from 1611 on back say the virtually same thing, at the same time ALL bibles printed after 1881 say something different, contradicting one another, changed missing or added words and verses…making the ESV different from the NIV…the NKJV different from the CEV…however, the modern trashlations tend to agree more with the NWT (Jehovah’s Witness bible) than they do with the KJB…the Bible of the Apostles.

Ever ask that question? Did you know that?

MIND BLOW: Even a sinner is a “servant of sin” (John 8:34). In the occult and New Age movement they slander us Christians and call us “slaves”. This and other “anti-Christian” graffiti was found written on an alter where satanic sacrifices took place, as reported by The San Antonio Express News.

For more on this, see the books, “New Age Bible” and “Language of the King James Bible”.

*NASV – 10 REVISED VERSIONS….NEARLY EVERY YEAR! THEY JUST CAN’T SEEM TO GET IT RIGHT, I GUESS!

Pass the Word KJB
www.passthewordkjb.com

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