Tag Archives: Yahweh

JEHOVAH VS. YAHWEH

LORD (YHWH, Yahweh or Jehovah)

Myth of No Vowels

This name of God is certainly the most mysterious. The name Yahweh (or Jehovah) was revealed to Moses at the burning bush (Exodus 3:11-15 KJB).

And Moses said unto God, Who am I, that I should go unto Pharaoh, and that I should bring forth the children of Israel out of Egypt?

And he said, Certainly I will be with thee; and this shall be a token unto thee, that I have sent thee: When thou hast brought forth the people out of Egypt, ye shall serve God upon this mountain.

And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say unto them?

 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.

And God said moreover unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, the Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: THIS IS MY NAME FOR EVER, and this is my memorial unto all generations.

God’s name is not Yahweh or any other pagan god name…it is Jehovah.  They are not other spellings or pronunciations…There is plenty of evidence. Yahweh is not just a scholarly guess as some would say. This is God’s name and we need to get it right. Jews have a tradition of never speaking God’s now. So over time we “forgot” how to spell or say God’s name. of never s…this is God’s Nehemia Gordon has found about 1000 Manuscripts that have the vowels! This is history changing evidence. It also should be noted that he could not find any ancient Jewish or Hebrew source with the name “Yahweh”

The study of God’s name has been the subject of the life work of Bible Scholar Nehemia Gordon. I could not begin to do his work justice by trying to quote every golden nugget. So, I will instead refer you to his very nicely laid out website. Full disclosure. I would disagree with Nehemia on several key points of doctrine. With that said, there simply is not a better, more researched scholar on the planet that knows this subject well. Nehemia Gordon has unequivocally proven that God’s name is NOT Yahweh or anything close. His name is I AM…His name is Jehovah!

I invite you to visit Nehemia’s Wall and discover Nehemia Gordon on the Name of God! He has many free videos for you to research and look at the evidence.

No doubt, if you are here, you have already done some research or you are at least curious. So, why is it so important Brother Kevin? Jehovah or Yahweh? Isn’t there other more important issues? The answer is absolutely yes…however, don’t you think it is important to know the name of the God you are worshipping? Unless it is a little clay statue…then who cares. Yahweh is a actually a pagan god. Please visit Nehemiah’s site…all of this is laid it in detail only he can provide.

Below is some further evidences and/or at least curiosities…

Evidence For Pronunciations Other Than Yahweh

I’ve heard several alternative pronunciation…here is one:

Professor George Buchanan, a professor emeritus at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington D.C.  points out that “the name ‘Yahweh’ does not even sound Semitic,” and he produces examples from Exodus 15 with “Yahweh” and “Yahowah” in the same sentences. Those with “Yahowah” sound “smooth and poetic,” while those with “Yahweh” “sound rough and unrythmical.” 

Buchanan concludes: “The accumulated data points heavily in the direction of a three syllable word, whose middle syllable was hô or hû. The first two syllables were Yahû or Yahô that were sometimes abbreviated to Yô.

For poetry, liturgy, and some other reasons, the name Yâh was also used. Only from Theodoret’s Greek spelling of the Samaritan use of the term is there any basis for the pronunciation ‘Yahweh’ or ‘Jahveh.’ This is hardly enough to overpower all of the other exhibits” (Ibid., 419).

So the three-syllable pronunciation “Ye-Ho-WaH” has some support from at least one verse which uses a rhyme scheme.  In that verse, two syllables – as in Yahweh – isn’t enough for make the rhythm fit; three are required.

It’s important to note that the first syllable in “Ye-Ho-WaH” is not pronounced with a hard “e”, as in “hear ye”.  It’s pronounced more softly like in “yes”, only without the “s” sound.

YHWH = Yehowah?

One excellent argument for the pronunciation “Ye-Ho-WaH” are the places where God’s name is used as part of other Biblical names.  I have a great quote that explain it clearly, but two bits of trivia are required for context first.

First, our English letter “J” isn’t new, but it’s pronunciation is quite new.  Until recently, our “J” was pronounced exactly like our “Y”.  Hence the spelling of all the names in the quote below will sound much more familiar if you replace the “Y” sound with a “J” sound. (Even though the “Y” opening is more correct.)

Second, a “*theophoric name” embeds all or part of a god’s name into another name.  This is typically done to honor the god or invoke its protection.  For example, the name “Christopher” means “Christ-bearer” and is intended to honor Christ in the naming of the child.

*”A theophoric name (from Greek: θεόφορος , theophoros, literally bearing or carrying a god) embeds the name of a god, both invoking and displaying the protection of that deity. For example, names embedding Apollo, such as Apollonios or Apollodorus, existed in Greek antiquity.” (Source)

Hebrew also had theophoric names:

Here are some examples of theophoric names that begin with the first three consonants of the Tetragrammaton: Yehoiakim, Yehonathan, Yehoshaphat, Yehoash, Yehoram, Yehoiada, Yehoiarib, Yehoaddah, Yehoaddan, Yehoahaz, Yehohanan, Yehoiarib, Yehonadab, Yehoshabeath, Yehosheba among others. These names were sometimes shortened to create new names, and this resulted in Yoiakim, Yonathan, etc.

When we compare the names that begin with the three first consonants of the Tetragrammaton (YHW), we see that all the names are vocalized YeHo-.

(Source)

I am not an authority on Hebrew or Greek.  In Bible College, I did have a Semester of Greek.  I loved it.  Not know if I was going to get a Masters or Doctorate, I appealed to the Dean to allow me to take further Greek course as an elective during my Bachelor Coursework as further Greek is only available and required as part of the Masters or Doctorate Program. 

Not being too braggadocios, I was a very good student.  😊 I never enjoyed school as I did during my year and a half studying the Bible and earning my BA.   Full disclosure, English was my worse subject.  Can I just say, if I may be so bold?  Quick, get the kiddies out of the room.  English sucked!  I hated ever bit of it.  My professor was awesome, in fact, I had him for some other courses…but grammar, as you may have notice was not my strength! Haha  

I was able to get special permission from the Dean of Students and what ever committee decides such things.  However, much to my regret, I did not take any further Greek Studies…at least in an official capacity.  So, as I was saying, I am no authority on Greek or Hebrew.  We did get a brief exposure of Hebrew in part of an Intro to Greek in the course. 

However, I will point you to many others who are vehemently more qualified than I am, once such source is Nehemia Gordon.  Another great resource, and slightly more approachable is Daniel W. Daniels; a well researched and trained in Bible Linguistics.   He studies many ancient manuscripts like you, and I would study Little Red Riding hood or Duck-Duck Goose.  This brother is one smart man.  Author of several books, available at Pass the Word KJB.

Again, this is more thought and discussion for the pronunciation “Yehowah”.

What About “Jehovah”?

Again, our letter “J” used to be pronounced like our letter “Y”.  Therefore “Jehovah” would’ve originally been pronounced “Yehovah”.  If you use the modern pronunciation for the Hebrew letter “ו” (Waw), it sounds like our “v” instead of our “w”.  Thus Yehowah becomes Jehovah. To me this is convincing and lets not forget Scholar Nehemia Gordon and his discovery of over 1000 ancient Manuscripts that have the vowels, thus proving a Jehovah pronunciation. He continues to hunt and research. I should further comment the 1000 figure I quoted, I believe comes from 2018. His work has continued and it would seem reasonable he has discovered more.

How does he pour over thousands of manuscripts looking for the vowels? He doesn’t He trains individuals to identify the word with the vowels. As they scour these manuscripts…they set aside all matches, which are then confirmed by Nehemiah. He has a video explaining how anyone can do this.

Conclusion

Can I be perfectly candid with you? because the Jews dare not udder than name of Jehovah for thousands of years no one has heard His name spoken. In fact, you have no doubt witnessed modern Jews write God this way, “G_d”. I have friends who are Jews and out of respect, I would not mention His name nor His title…except for the NAME , “JESUS” (Acts 4:!2), but that is deliberate for reasons you perhaps have guessed. But nonetheless a tale for another time perhaps. So, there it goes or so says the argument, one cannot be sure how YHWH is properly pronounced.

However despite the any scholarly consensus on “Yahweh”, I think “Yehowah” (Ye-Ho-Wah), Jehovah indeed fits the evidence best. And I am certain, quite certain that, oh yes! We can know the name of our God! Further, I’m not a Hebrew scholar.  (I know far more Greek than Hebrew, and I wouldn’t even call myself a Greek scholar.)

I do intend to be dogmatic about the pronunciation.  I will never be content with such a reckless statement as we see coming from the so called experts, the so called scholars, some meaningful, however, “Whether it is Yahweh, Yehowah, or something else we all know who we mean.” While it is absolutely crucial that we honor Him and His character, that we love Him and share Him with all that we come in contact with (Mark 16:15), it is equally important and perhaps vital to our very salvation to give Him praise above all other names and that we, within our finite human abilities pronounce His name the God of all gods, perfectly!  

And His name is Jehovah! El Shaddai: God Almighty

“He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.”, Psalm 91:1

I really like the song Yahweh.  But listen close, they make it three syllables – “Ya-Ha-Weh” – to make it fit.  His name is Jehovah!

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